About Hearing Aids

There is a stigma that often comes with hearing aids including some myths that propel the stereotype. This is surprising for those of us in the industry who are familiar with the advanced technology and features now available with new hearing aids.

Myths vs. Facts about Hearing Aids

Hearing aids have been around for quite a while now and somehow they have gotten a bit of a bad reputation. There is a stigma that often comes with hearing aids including some myths that propel the stereotype. This is surprising for those of us in the industry who are familiar with the advanced technology and features now available with new hearing aids. Here are some myths vs. facts about hearing aids.

Myth: Hearing loss and the need for hearing aids is rare.
Fact: Over 28 million people in the U.S. have hearing loss; that translates to one in ten people.

Myth: Hearing aids are big, obvious, and always make whistling noises.
Fact: New technology has made hearing aids much more advanced. They are not the clunky, whistling devices that you may remember your grandparents wearing. They are now smaller, more discrete, sleek devices. Some are almost completely invisible. They have built-in settings that eliminate the feedback, which is what caused the whistling noises in hearing aids of the past.

Myth: I would know if I needed a hearing aid.
Fact: Since hearing loss is usually a slow progression, most people don’t recognize they have a hearing problem since it doesn’t happen overnight.

Myth: I only have mild hearing loss, so I don’t need a hearing aid.
Fact: A proper hearing assessment by a hearing professional is the only way to know if you would benefit from hearing aids.

Myth: Hearing aids won’t help me hear again.
Fact: High frequency hearing loss is the most common type of hearing loss. About 95% of people with high frequency hearing loss will hear again with the help of hearing aids. Even if you don’t have high frequency hearing loss, there are still hearing aids that will help you hear again.

Myth: I only need one hearing aid.
Fact: Only a hearing assessment will help us determine if you need one or two hearing aids. We have what is called binaural hearing. That means we use both ears for hearing. They actually work in conjunction to help localize sound and filter noises. In many cases, two hearing aids are used to help reproduce binaural hearing and deliver a natural hearing effect.

Hearing, Balance, & Speech Center is Here to Help You with all Your Listening Needs

Have more questions about hearing aids? We can guide you to the right size and style for you. Please contact us at Hearing, Balance, & Speech Center to speak with one of our hearing professionals. We are here to help you make the most of your hearing aids and take care of all your listening needs.

Sources

  1. http://www.betterhearing.org/hearingpedia/myths-about-hearing-loss
  2. https://www.asha.org/public/hearing/Hearing-Aid-Myths-and-Facts/
  3. http://www.iwanttohear.com/wps/wcm/connect/iwh-us/home/you-and-your-hearing/facts-and-myths